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Retiree Corner
May 08, 2017

Older Americans Month: Age Out Loud

(This article first appeared in the May-June 2017 issue of The American Postal Worker magazine.)

By Retirees Director Nancy Olumekor

The first Older Americans Month (OAM) was launched in 1963, aimed at celebrating the contributions and lives of older Americans. 

This year’s theme is “Age Out Loud,” highlighting “the ways older adults are living their lives with boldness, confidence, and passion, while serving as an inspiration to people of all ages. Getting older doesn’t mean what it used to… For many aging Americans, it is a phase of life where interests, goals, and dreams can get a new or second start,” said the Agency on Aging of South Central Connecticut.

Today, aging is about eliminating outdated perceptions and living the way that suits you best. Older Americans are taking charge, striving for wellness, focusing on independence and advocating for themselves and others. What it means to age has changed. OAM 2017 is a perfect opportunity to recognize and celebrate what getting older looks like today.

The APWU Retiree Department would like you, your local and chapter to use OAM 2017 to focus on how older retirees in the APWU are redefining aging. Through work or family interests, by taking charge of your health and staying independent for as long as possible, and through your community and advocacy efforts, use this opportunity to learn how we can best support and learn from our older members.

Share the story with your members of an older APWU Retiree member in your local or state who is “Aging Out Loud.”

Send their story to the APWU Retiree Department, Attn: Age Out Loud, 1300 L Street NW, Washington, DC 20005. Submissions need to arrive no later than July 15. Please limit the story to 300 words or less. Photos can be included.


USPS Claim of Overpayments or Outstanding Debts of Retired Employees

Retirees have a right to file a grievance when becoming aware of an alleged outstanding debt owed to the USPS. That right is in the contract and JCIM under Article 15, Section 7- Outstanding Debts of Retired Employees.

The APWU and the USPS agreed, in part, that:

“Due Process requires prior notice. Retirees are entitled to a written notice, including notice of their right to file a grievance, before the Postal Service takes any action to collect on an alleged payroll issue or outstanding debt. If a timely grievance is filed, the collection of the debt will be delayed until final disposition of the grievance, either through settlement or exhaustion of contractual remedies. The Postal Service may not submit a Request for Recovery of Debt to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) before the grievance/arbitration procedure has been exhausted. The Article 15 time limits apply. A Step 1 grievance must be filed within fourteen (14) days of the date on which the employee or the Union first learned of its cause, the alleged payroll or collection dispute.”

Retirees, when you receive any type of notice from the USPS or OPM claiming that you owe the USPS money, you must act immediately. The notice may come in the form of a Notice of Determination of a Debt, a Letter of Indebtedness, a Letter of Demand or an invoice from the USPS.

Read the letter completely, then contact the local union representative where you last worked to file a grievance.


May 08, 2017

Miners Win Permanent Funding for Retirement Health Care

WEB NEWS ARTICLE #: 
43-2017

05/05/2017 -

Miners at Sept. 8, 2016 Keep the Promise Rally 
Image courtesy of the United Mine Workers of America

On May 4, Congress passed legislation providing for 22,600 retired coal miners, widows and dependents to have the health care they were promised by the federal government and earned through going into the mines for decades to power the country.

The members of the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) have been rallying and lobbying Congress to secure their promised retirement benefits since Patriot Coal’s bankruptcy filing in 2012. On Sept. 8, 2016, APWU officers and staff stood in solidarity with over eight thousand miners, widows, coalfield community members and union supporters at the UMWA’s rally in front of the U.S. Capitol.

“I congratulate United Mine Workers of America President Cecil Roberts and the entire mine workers’ union on this important victory,” said APWU President Mark Dimondstein. “They stood by their members, and took to the streets to secure these benefits. This shows what true worker solidarity and community activism can accomplish.” 

“Tens of thousands of our members, both retired and active, have marched, rallied, written letters and made phone calls to their representatives in Washington, urging passage of this legislation,” said UMWA International President Cecil E. Roberts. “They deserve the lion’s share of the credit for getting us to this day.”

According to the UMWA, the government will now provide retirement health care to ‘orphaned’ union miners, to those who lost their coverage because of a recent coal company bankruptcy or closure.

 “Congress has done the right thing by providing permanent funding for the care coal miners need,” said AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, who is a former International President of the UMWA. “Union members kept our part of the bargain while mining corporations used bankruptcy laws to break their promises to provide good health benefits and a secure retirement.”

This legislation, “will mean the difference between life and death for thousands of senior citizens throughout the coalfields,” Roberts said.

However, there is another part of the struggle, securing the miners’ pension fund, which is still unresolved. “As much as we enjoy this victory the fight is not over. We must waste no time to develop a solution to the pension crisis that is looming for even more retired miners and widows. If Congress does not act soon, 89,000 current pensions and 30,000 of those who are owed a pension in the future will not get what they earned.”

Go to umwa.org to learn more about the UMWA’s triumphant battle to secure retirement health care for their members and find out what you can do to support their ongoing struggle to preserve the retired miners' pensions. 

APWU National Officers and staff at the UMWA's rally on Sept. 8, 2016. 

Feb 16, 2017

For CSRS Retirees:

The 2018 CSRS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

CSRS COLA

CSRS COLA

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FERS Retirees:

The 2018 FERS retiree COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. However, if the CPI-W quarterly average increases 3% or more, they subtract 1%. A 5% increase in the quarterly CPI-W average results in a 4% adjustment. If the quarterly average increases from 2% to 3%, benefits increase by 2%. A CPI-W quarterly average increase of 2% or less will increase benefits by the change in the CPI-W quarterly average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

FERS COLA

FERS COLA

 1995

2.0%

2008

2.0%

1996

2.0%

2009

4.8%

1997

2.0%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.0%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

2.6%

2000

2.0%

2013

1.7%

2001

2.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.0%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.0%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.0%

2018

2006

3.1%

2007

2.3%


For Social Security Recipients:

The 2018 Social Security COLA is based on the third quarter (July, August, September) average CPI-W index (1982-84=100) in 2017 over the 2016 third quarter average. After the fourth quarter of 2016, the first quarter for the 2018 COLA adjustment period, the quarterly average has risen slightly by 0.2%.

Social Security

Social Security

1995

2.8%

2008

2.3%

1996

2.6%

2009

5.8%

1997

2.9%

2010

0.0%

1998

2.1%

2011

0.0%

1999

1.3%

2012

3.6%

2000

2.4%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.5%

2014

1.5%

2002

2.6%

2015

1.7%

2003

1.4%

2016

0%

2004

2.1%

2017

0.3%

2005

2.7%

2018

2006

4.1%

2007

3.3%


For FECA Employees:

The percentage increase in the December CPI-W (1982-84=100) index from year to year determines the FECA COLA increase.  After the first month of the 12-month measuring period for the 2018 FECA COLA the index rose 0.622%.

FECA COLA

1995

2.7%

2008

4.3%

1996

2.5%

2009

0.0%

1997

3.3%

2010

3.4%

1998

1.5%

2011

1.7%

1999

1.6%

2012

3.2%

2000

2.7%

2013

1.7%

2001

3.4%

2014

1.5%

2002

1.3%

2015

0.3%

2003

2.4%

2016

0.4%

2004

1.6%

2017

2.0%

2005

3.4%

2018

2006

3.5%

2007

2.4%


Jan 09, 2017

Fighting for Justice: Elder Financial Abuse

According to experts, financial fraud is the fastest growing form of elder abuse. “Financial elder abuse is when someone illegally or improperly uses a vulnerable senior’s money or other property,” explains Barbara Repa, legal writer and editor for Nolo.com. In many cases, the victim and his/her family does not know the crimes and/or abuse have occurred.

This is a personal issue for me. My aunt was a victim of financial abuse. The perpetrator entered her home and stole her passport, financial and personal records. He opened internet accounts in her name, used her bank and credit cards, and changed the addresses on her utility bills. He kept a notebook that listed her family members’ names, addresses and SSNs.

Our family did not find out about the theft until the police called to say they found her information and valuables with other neighbors’ burgled possessions. The police stated her passport and utility bills were valuable in order to steal her identity.

Identify Elder Financial Abuse

To protect yourself or your loved ones from elder financial abuse you must learn what it looks like, ways to prevent it and what to do if you suspect that you or a family member are targeted.

Seniors who live alone, or with another senior, can become targets. Perpetrators could be anyone from strangers, to family members, friends, acquaintances or neighbors.

How do you know if a senior in your life is vulnerable to financial abuse? The following factors increase the chances of being victimized, says The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA):

  • Isolation,
  • Loneliness,
  • Recent Loss,
  • Physical or mental disabilities,
  • Lack of familiarity with financial matters,
  • Have a family member(s) who are unemployed and/or have substance abuse problems.

Start by protecting and securing any mail or documents containing your personal identifying information, for example, your passport, Social Security card, birth certificate, tax information, etc. Each month these documents should be stored away in a safe, out of sight, location.

Do not hide the documents from yourself! Make sure someone in your family knows your monthly routine for handling these documents. Also, use a shredder when you throw away mail or other documents containing personal identifying information. Even your recycling bin is not safe.

Warning Signs

Learn the warning signs of elder financial abuse in order to protect yourself or a loved one. Knowing the indicators can prevent abuse, but some can be explained by other causes, and no single clue is proof. Look for patterns suggesting a problem.

According to the NCPEA, indicators include:

  • Unpaid bills, eviction notices, or notices to discontinue utilities,
  • Unexplainable withdrawals from bank accounts or transfers between accounts,
  • Bank statements and canceled checks no longer come to the house,
  • New “best friends,”
  • Legal documents, such as power of attorney, and/or checks the senior does not remember signing,
  • The care of the senior is not commensurate with the size of his/her estate,
  • A caregiver expresses excessive interest in the amount of money being spent on the senior,
  • Belongings or property are missing,
  • Lack of documentation about financial arrangements,
  • Implausible explanations about the elderly person’s finances given by the senior or caregiver,
  • The senior is unaware of or does not understand the financial arrangements made for him/her.

If you think you or a loved one is a victim of elder financial abuse, do not hesitate to learn more. Visit the site www.preventelderabuse.org, to learn what steps you can take. 4

Resources: The National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (NCPEA), Forbes.com, and NOLO.com.


Aug 30, 2016

APWU 2016 National Convention

from a Retiree’s Perspective

by Scott Morrow, DMAL Retiree Chapter President

The Denver Metro Retiree Chapter drafted me to attend the APWU Convention as an observer only, no voice and no votes.  Our Chapter has a couple of full dues paying members out of around 200 who could run for delegate.  Delegates have a voice and a vote.

Each Region provides for a single elected Retiree delegate elected to a three-year term by the retirees paying $36 each year in dues.  We vote for the Western Region Retiree Delegate who is currently Byron Denton from Northern California.  I met with Brother Denton, who has served the APWU membership for decades.  At age 88, this will be his last convention. 

ARTICLE 5 of the APWU Constitution outlines the convention procedures.  My favorite part of this article is section 7:

SEC. 7. All delegates in attendance at national, regional, or state conventions shall be required to wear clothing and other articles insofar as possible, bearing the union label.

All my Union shirts are made in the USA by Union workers while my jeans, socks and jeans shorts were made in the USA.  My New Balance union made in the USA shoes are too worn out for wearing as an observer for my Retiree Chapter. 

Retiree Conference Saturday and Sunday

A complimentary breakfast from 5:30 AM to 6:45 AM Mountain time was available both Saturday and Sunday of the conference.  The workers setting up the banquet were Union members!  The first morning there was no fruit, so I mentioned it to one the Union Brothers and the next day we had lots of fruit. J

I touched base with  Byron Denton (who received an award for over three decades as Western Area Retiree delegate), Bobby Donnelson, President of the Southwest CA Retiree Chapter,  Dr. Pat Williams, Candidate for Byron’s spot, National Officers and Shirley Taylor, my clerk NBA when I was in Reno, NV.

Phil Gardner of OPM made the best presentation of the day.  Most important, we can change our FEHB enrollment at any time if it is a decrease or from self and one or family to self only.  I spent some time at the icebreaker getting his contact info and developing rapport in case we need issues resolved.  OPM, like social security and Medicare, have had their budgets slashed by the Republican Majorities in Congress, over and again making it nearly impossible for them to meet demand.   Therefore, OPM has given us complete access to our accounts at www.servicesonline.opm.gov.

  

Rich Fiesta, the author of the Alliance Reports I receive and repost on the Chapter Face Book page made a great presentation.  He covered much of what Judy Beard did, immediately following his presentation as the Alliance is a legislative organization chartered by the AFL-CIO in 2001, who works closely with NARFE or the National Association of Retired Federal Employees. 

Judy Beard covered both legislative issues and retiree chapter topics.  The previous CBA included language to afford retirees the right to grieve any USPSBS collection demands and the latest CBA requires notice to retirees of this right.  We also now have a contractual right to apply for temporary USPS work during the Christmas rush period and those hired receive $16.06 hourly with zero consequences for your retirement. 

There was a social security presentation that couldn’t hold a candle to the one we had at our meeting on two occasions by John.  The Health Plan Director was there and did a short presentation and answered questions.

I snatched up any/all available information to add to the small satchel of information provided at the beginning.  Included were the resolutions , which we debated on Sunday.

Resolutions affecting you were prioritized by the five elected National Convention Retiree Delegates as follows:

1.     Article 3 of the APWU Constitution, Resolution 4 would increase the associate health plan dues from $35 to $40.  The conference adopted this resolution due to the impossible situation we face when the health plan puts APWU retires in as associate members in lieu of chapter members.  We are losing hundreds of dollars in our budget every year due to this fiasco. 

2.     Article 11, Section 2 (1), Resolution 12:  Require APWU to pay expenses for our five delegates to attend the conventions and retiree conferences.  The conference adopted the resolution because President Burris had refused to pay their expenses.

3.      Article 13, Section 1, Paragraph 4, Resolution 13 places the Retirees Director on the National Executive Board with voice and vote.  The conference adopted, for obvious reasons.  We built the Union and should have a voice on the highest governing body.

4.     Article 6, Resolution 5 would require APWU to give delegate status to one Retiree Chapter delegate for each 100 members thereof.  The conference adopted this because we need a voice and vote at conventions.  Retiree membership is exponentially increasing while union membership of workers continues to decrease.

Most of these resolutions have been submitted at two or more previous conventions and have failed to pass. Tomorrow the convention starts on the Constitution and CBA resolution determination process.

The first two days of the convention started out with a Denver Region caucus at 6:00 AM Mountain Time.  I was provided time Tuesday morning to go over the Retiree’s top four resolutions.  For the most part the delegation was supportive.  The biggest issue was that the entire delegation, except two of us, paid full dues and we pay $36 annually.  My take on their position was that I needed to pay a poll tax of $648 annually (current Denver Metro Local Dues) to have a vote.  Under the DMAL constitution that would also require me to run in an election for the general spot and win.

The convention always started at 7:30 AM Mountain Time with interesting speakers.  My favorites were Nina Turner, Jim Hightower, Keith Ellison, Ed Schultz, DR Mona Hanna-Attish and the Presidents of the Carriers and Mail handlers. All but a handful of the resolutions discussed over the four days had zero bearing on my constituency.  The Retiree Resolutions supported by the Denver Region Caucus and the Retiree Conference all went up in smoke except for one. 

Article 11, Section 2   (1), Resolution 12 that required APWU to pay expenses for our five delegates to attend the conventions and retiree conferences obtained the two thirds majority necessary to pass! 

I am recommending to any Retiree Chapter that until we achieve voting status on the convention floor, it is best to send a representative to the conference only and save all the other expenses.   I must admit the DMAL was supportive in every way.  President Kirby invited me to a great dinner that helped us bond, and it was really good and lots of fun.

The Denver Region was also supportive and gave me a voice at morning caucuses. 

Being invited to the caucuses actually makes it worthwhile to hang around the first two days of the convention, if affordable.  Rest assured, the Retiree Caucus will be bringing forth the resolutions yet again in 2018!

/rb

opeiu #30

afl-cio


Jan 28, 2015

Sometimes It Hurts To Be Right

by Scott Morrow, President DMAL Retiree Chapter

          I take very little pleasure in accurately forecasting what we are in store for from the Republican majority in Congress.  For those who read my article in the last edition of the voice, titled Elections Have Consequences, you know my outlook was a bit dreary.

          Writing this article just a couple days after the Republican’s took control of Congress it is clear an all-out assault on the poor, the middle class, Unions and our

environment was the top priority of those folks.  This is a surprise for those who miss their opportunities to pay attention to the agenda.  This party has been for the rich and the monopolies since President Eisenhower finished his term.

          First, the rules have been changed in the House regarding economic impacts of legislation.  Our High School Civics class taught us that ALL spending must start in the House.  In past years, the Congressional Budget Office or CBO, a nonpartisan agency, would determine the cost of legislation many times before a vote was taken.  Now, under the new rules passed, dynamic scoring will be used.  This is the “voodoo” economics theory we saw originally instituted during Reagan where by giving hundreds of billions in tax breaks for the rich and monopolies, that money will ‘trickle down”.  Over three decades of history have shown us this did not work and will NOT work for retirees, or anyone else except the affluent.

          Also introduced on the first day of the new Congress was a rule to prevent  what was a routine transfer of social security trust fund cash to the disability fund to ensure payments to disabled Americans.  Many estimate that nearly eleven million SSDI recipients will experience reductions of around 20% in their social security payments.  Millions more will be cut off from the program entirely.

          Added into the omnibus bill right before the last Congress adjourned were massive cuts to pensions of Union members.  Many companies with Union Workers pooled the pension funds into shared funds.  These funds were hit hard by losses due to the banksters crash of the world economy in 2008.  Due to thepassage of the continuing funding of the US budget last month, all those folks receiving pensions or getting near retirement will see drastic cuts to their annuities of up to 50% to balance the pension books.

          The top legislative agenda for both the House and Senate is to bypass current protocol’s for the Keystone XL pipeline.  While the President at this time has promised a veto, this is a disaster for retirees health and property.  Under current law, a foreign company will take property it wants (called eminent domain) to build the pipeline to move the dirtiest oil on the planet through the USA to refineries on the gulf coast for export to foreign countries.  Gas prices will increase in the USA.  Materials for the pipeline will be foreign.  Retirees will get the oil spills, the deadly pollution and increased health care costs while foreigners enrich themselves at our expense.  All for about 30 permanent full time jobs.

          Combine this with the dynamic scoring that will result in huge deficits like it did when Reagan tripled the National Debt, causing screaming from the highest rooftops about debt once a democrat got into office with cuts in pensions and social security already passed and we are in serious trouble.

          Currently in committee already are bills to end Obama Care (PPACA), restrict abortion, cut SNAP and TANF, tax cuts to the wealthy and monopolies, etc.  The same old legislation we saw in the last two Congresses to finalize our transformation into a full blown oligarchy.

          What can we do?  First we need to take back our democracy before it is too late, get out the vote, support a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United (Supreme Court Decision that legalized limitless cash bribery of elected Representatives in the form of contributions) and get involved with your Union and Retiree Chapter Legislative Departments.   Educate yourself on what is going on.   If you have cable or satellite, watch CPAN.  Use non-monopoly media for your news.  PBS, Link TV and Free Speech TV are examples of viewer supported stations that actually practice journalism.  Come to your meetings and read all the publications you receive.  The APWU monthly periodical has articles on the key issues facing Unions by our Legislative Officers, every edition! 

          While your social security is already directly affected after just the first day of the 114th Congress, your FERS or CSRS retirement will be next.  The time has come for you to actively join the struggle.  Think of it this way, there are about 400billionaires and like number of monopolies who have bought Congress.  There are at least 200 million of us getting poorer every day.  Certainly, once we all join the moral cause to protect the least among us and keep what we have earned after decades of working towards our retirement we will far outnumber the few with all the cash.  You have to like those odds, 200 million against the paltry, yet greedy, 800? 

After all, it is only together that we can overcome.


Jan 07, 2015

Postal Retirement Benefits

The APWU and other federal unions have worked with Congress for many decades to ensure retirement income security for employees who spend their careers in government service.

Today, most postal employees are eligible to participate in one of two federal retirement benefit programs:

The Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS), which provides benefits for most workers hired before 1984.

The Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS), which covers all workers hired after 1984.

Though FERS pays a smaller monthly benefit than CSRS, FERS retirees also receive Social Security and Thrift Savings Plan payments.

Whichever plan you are enrolled in, your retirement benefits are administered by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM).

Regardless of how many more years you may work before retirement, it's a good idea to understand all the benefits you earn and to plan early.

For complete information about the CSRS and FERS, visit OPM's Federal Retirement Programs Web site, www.opm.gov/retire/index.asp, or visit your USPS personnel office.


Jan 06, 2015

Medicare Enrollment

General enrollment in Medicare is open from Jan. 1 through March 31, but don’t confuse the general enrollment period with your eligibility enrollment period: You are eligible to enroll in Medicare three months before you turn 65, the month of your 65th birthday, and three months after the month you turn 65.

You will be penalized if you enroll outside of your eligibility period and your options to enroll will be limited.

If you miss your eligibility window, you may sign up only during the general enrollment period at the beginning of the year, with few exceptions. And, if Social Security records reflect that you have enrolled late, you will be required to pay a penalty in addition to the monthly premium. The penalty for enrolling late is 10 percent for each year you delay enrollment in Medicare Part B.

For most USPS retirees, the premium for Medicare Part B for 2015 is $104.90. Medicare B covers medically-necessary services from doctors and other health care providers, ambulance services, outpatient care, home health care, and some preventative services. For a complete list of covered services, visit www.Medicare.gov.

Medicare Part A covers hospitalization and it’s free because you paid for it while you worked for the Postal Service. You are eligible for Medicare Part A if you are over 65, under 65 with certain disabilities, or currently receiving Social Security benefits. If you are covered by the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP) you will not be penalized if you sign-up for Medicare Part A after age 65.

The questions asked most frequently about Medicare are:

How do I enroll? - You can sign up for Medicare by visiting your local Social Security office or by completing an online application at www.socialsecurity.gov. You may also call to request an appointment to enroll by phone by calling 1-800-772-1213; TTY/TDD: 1-877-486-2048.

How do I make the payment for Medicare Part B? - There is a range of options for paying Medicare premiums. You may pay by automatic bill payment through your bank account (also known as Medicare Easy Pay), by check, or the payments may be withheld from your Social Security or annuity benefit. Be clear with Social Security on the payment method you select to avoid a delay in processing your first payments.

Should I keep my Federal Employee Health Benefits Plan and enroll in Medicare Parts A and B as well? - That’s a personal decision; when weighing your options, you should consider your usage of medical services, your ability to pay, and the penalty for enrolling late in Medicare Part B. When you retain your FEHB Plan and enroll in Medicare A and B, Medicare will be your primary payer and your FEHB Plan will cover most of the difference. APWU retirees who are in the APWU Health Plan have expressed appreciation for having both Medicare and our health plan. If you have a FEHB plan other than APWU, you should contact your FEHB plan for advice.

When does Medicare take effect? The date coverage begins depends on when you enrolled. If you enrolled during your 65th birthday enrollment period, coverage starts the first day of your birth month, unless your birthday is on the first day of the month; if your birthday is on the first day of the month, the coverage starts on the prior month. If you enrolled the month after your 65th, there is a delay of one month for each month you delay in getting coverage after turning 65. For example, if you wait one month after your birth month to sign up, coverage will start two months after you sign up. Finally, if you sign up during the general enrollment period, coverage starts on July 1 of that year.

For more information about Medicare, call 1-800-772-1213 or visit www.Medicare.gov.


Jan 08, 2014
APWU

About the APWU Retirees Department

The APWU Retirees Department is the voice of retired APWU members — within the union and on Capitol Hill.

Retirees helped build the union as we fought for — and won — better wages, improved benefits, and the right to be treated with dignity and respect.

Now, the union fights for retirees as Congress makes budget and policy decisions that affect our pensions and healthcare coverage, and that impact our lives in a profound way. The Retirees Department seeks to organize retired APWU members to join in these struggles.

The department also provides members with opportunities to see old friends — and make new ones— by participating in the activities of APWU Retiree Chapters and other union events.

The APWU Retirees Department was established in 1992 by delegates to the union’s 11th Biennial National Convention. Our goal was to bring retirees back into the union family while advancing the objectives of retired and active union members. The creation of the department required the passage of an amendment to the APWU Constitution and Bylaws, approved by more than two-thirds of voting delegates.

At subsequent conventions, delegates amended the constitution to strengthen the voice of retirees in union affairs, voting to allow retirees to elect five regional Retirees National Convention Delegates; to improve funding of retiree chapters, and to allow members of the APWU Retirees Department to elect the department director, beginning with the 2007 election of national officers.

Currently, there are more than 80,000 APWU Retirees Department members, 39local Retiree chapters, and four state chapters.


Jul 07, 2011
.
Jul 07, 2011
Retirement Annuity Calculation Use one of the worksheets below to develop an estimation of your retirement annuity.


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